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Ethics

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9th, 10th, 11th

Aristotle’s virtue theory CrashCourse exit quiz

Have AI quiz students on the contents of Hank Green’s “Aristotle & Virtue Theory” CrashCourse YouTube video.

Screenshot of student session next to the CrashCourse YouTube video.
Screenshot of student session next to the CrashCourse YouTube video.
Screenshot of student session next to the CrashCourse YouTube video.

Teaching goals

Watching a CrashCourse YouTube video can serve as a quick and engaging introduction to a new unit. But, it can be difficult to gauge whether students fully understood the content or just found the video to be entertaining.

On top of that, creating assessments based on YouTube videos can be taxing for teachers. With Flint, the AI can process the transcript of any YouTube video and assess a student’s understanding of the content in 1-1 conversations.

In this example, as you can see below, the teacher provided the link to the YouTube video — a CrashCourse Philosophy video by Hank Green on Aristotle & Virtue Theory — to Flint. Additionally, the teacher specified a specific learning objective that students should have met having watched the video.

Learning objective:

Quiz students on the contents of this CrashCourse video. Students should demonstrate a basic understanding of Aristotle’s virtue theory. They should be able to explain the Golden Mean, and how it exists as the midpoint between vices of excess and deficiency.

YouTube | Aristotle & Virtue Theory: Crash Course Philosophy #38

Extra customization

Flint automatically sets up an AI tutor that is designed to evaluate how well the student has understood the contents of the video. The behavior of the AI can be understood by viewing the auto-generated rules.

Tutor type and rules showing how this tutor will evaluate students' understanding of the contents in the video.

To use this AI tutor as an exit ticket, we can make it timed and also set a deadline so that it will expire just after the end of class.

Tutor shown with countdown and deadline set.

Student experience

During the conversation with the AI, students will be quizzed by the AI about various aspects of Aristotle’s virtue theory, as covered in the CrashCourse video.

As students answer questions correctly, the AI will ask more advanced questions to test the student’s understanding.

Screenshot of student session showing how Flint is asking them to dig deeper and provide more examples.

Once the student has submitted their session (or when the 10-minute timer is up or when the deadline has passed), they’ll get immediate feedback highlighting their strengths as well as any areas for improvement. This data is available to the teacher as well.

Extra customization

Flint automatically sets up an AI tutor that is designed to evaluate how well the student has understood the contents of the video. The behavior of the AI can be understood by viewing the auto-generated rules.

Tutor type and rules showing how this tutor will evaluate students' understanding of the contents in the video.

To use this AI tutor as an exit ticket, we can make it timed and also set a deadline so that it will expire just after the end of class.

Tutor shown with countdown and deadline set.

Ethics

|

9th, 10th, 11th

Aristotle’s virtue theory CrashCourse exit quiz

Have AI quiz students on the contents of Hank Green’s “Aristotle & Virtue Theory” CrashCourse YouTube video.

Screenshot of student session next to the CrashCourse YouTube video.

Inputs

Learning objective:

Quiz students on the contents of this CrashCourse video. Students should demonstrate a basic understanding of Aristotle’s virtue theory. They should be able to explain the Golden Mean, and how it exists as the midpoint between vices of excess and deficiency.

YouTube | Aristotle & Virtue Theory: Crash Course Philosophy #38

Teaching goals

Watching a CrashCourse YouTube video can serve as a quick and engaging introduction to a new unit. But, it can be difficult to gauge whether students fully understood the content or just found the video to be entertaining.

On top of that, creating assessments based on YouTube videos can be taxing for teachers. With Flint, the AI can process the transcript of any YouTube video and assess a student’s understanding of the content in 1-1 conversations.

In this example, as you can see below, the teacher provided the link to the YouTube video — a CrashCourse Philosophy video by Hank Green on Aristotle & Virtue Theory — to Flint. Additionally, the teacher specified a specific learning objective that students should have met having watched the video.

Extra customization

Flint automatically sets up an AI tutor that is designed to evaluate how well the student has understood the contents of the video. The behavior of the AI can be understood by viewing the auto-generated rules.

Tutor type and rules showing how this tutor will evaluate students' understanding of the contents in the video.

To use this AI tutor as an exit ticket, we can make it timed and also set a deadline so that it will expire just after the end of class.

Tutor shown with countdown and deadline set.

Student experience

During the conversation with the AI, students will be quizzed by the AI about various aspects of Aristotle’s virtue theory, as covered in the CrashCourse video.

As students answer questions correctly, the AI will ask more advanced questions to test the student’s understanding.

Screenshot of student session showing how Flint is asking them to dig deeper and provide more examples.

Once the student has submitted their session (or when the 10-minute timer is up or when the deadline has passed), they’ll get immediate feedback highlighting their strengths as well as any areas for improvement. This data is available to the teacher as well.

With the AI chat history, I can see what the kids are thinking through their writing. The kids also thoroughly enjoyed the Flint assignment. At back-to-school night last week, I had several parents mention that their kids went home and talked about the ‘cool assignment’. It's not often kids openly share with their parents about their classroom experiences, so that was great to hear.”

Zach Richards headshot

Zach Richards

Ethics teacher at Episcopal

Spark AI-powered learning at your school.

Start a trial to get free access to Flint for any number of teachers and administrators at your school.

Watch the video

Spark AI-powered learning at your school.

Start a trial to get free access to Flint for any number of teachers and administrators at your school.

Watch the video

Spark AI-powered learning at your school.

Start a trial to get free access to Flint for any number of teachers and administrators at your school.

Watch the video