Computer Science

|

10th, 11th, 12th

Python coding competition: Student versus AI

Place students head-to-head in a Python programming competition against AI that automatically matches their level.

Student session of the competition with AI and example of code editor in use.
Student session of the competition with AI and example of code editor in use.
Student session of the competition with AI and example of code editor in use.

Teaching goals

Once students master the basics of a programming language, interactive exercises can be a great way for them to put their skills to the test.

With Flint, teachers can provide with the AI with learning objectives and content (e.g. a syllabus, as shown below) that cover programming concepts that students should be familiar with.

Learning objective:

Students should be able to demonstrate the understanding of all the concepts in the attached syllabus. They should be able to both explain their understanding of each of the concepts (e.g. what a if statement is and what it can be used for) and be able to program in Python using the concepts.

Syllabus - Harvard's CS50's Intro to Programming with Python

Extra customization

Flint automatically creates an AI tutor that can quiz students on their understanding of these Python concepts.

To improve student engagement, the teacher can use the “revise” feature to turn this into an exciting competition for students.

Revision request to make the tutor into a competition between the AI and student and the updated initial prompt to start the conversation.

The AI tutor will now “compete” with students on various coding exercises that incorporate the content covered in the course syllabus that the teacher originally uploaded.

The teacher can use the “revise” feature again, this time to simplify the grading of the assignment to have it more closely mimic the outcome of a competition.

Revision request to change the grading rubric to be win, draw, or loss and the rubric generated by Flint per that request.

Finally, the teacher can make the competition timed.

Session with timer duration set for 20 minutes.

Student experience

As soon as the student starts the session with the AI tutor, they’ll engage in a back-and-forth coding competition with the AI. The student can make use of Flint’s built-in code editor to enter their submission for each problem.

Code editor screenshot showing some inputted python code.

Once the 20-minute timer runs out, the session gets automatically submitted. Students immediately find out if they won, lost, or drew against the AI!

Example student submission where the student won against the AI.

Additionally, Flint uses AI to generate a summary of the student’s strengths and areas of improvement. All of this information is accessible to the teacher as well.

Extra customization

Flint automatically creates an AI tutor that can quiz students on their understanding of these Python concepts.

To improve student engagement, the teacher can use the “revise” feature to turn this into an exciting competition for students.

Revision request to make the tutor into a competition between the AI and student and the updated initial prompt to start the conversation.

The AI tutor will now “compete” with students on various coding exercises that incorporate the content covered in the course syllabus that the teacher originally uploaded.

The teacher can use the “revise” feature again, this time to simplify the grading of the assignment to have it more closely mimic the outcome of a competition.

Revision request to change the grading rubric to be win, draw, or loss and the rubric generated by Flint per that request.

Finally, the teacher can make the competition timed.

Session with timer duration set for 20 minutes.

Computer Science

|

10th, 11th, 12th

Python coding competition: Student versus AI

Place students head-to-head in a Python programming competition against AI that automatically matches their level.

Student session of the competition with AI and example of code editor in use.

Teaching goals

Once students master the basics of a programming language, interactive exercises can be a great way for them to put their skills to the test.

With Flint, teachers can provide with the AI with learning objectives and content (e.g. a syllabus, as shown below) that cover programming concepts that students should be familiar with.

Learning objective:

Students should be able to demonstrate the understanding of all the concepts in the attached syllabus. They should be able to both explain their understanding of each of the concepts (e.g. what a if statement is and what it can be used for) and be able to program in Python using the concepts.

Syllabus - Harvard's CS50's Intro to Programming with Python

Extra customization

Flint automatically creates an AI tutor that can quiz students on their understanding of these Python concepts.

To improve student engagement, the teacher can use the “revise” feature to turn this into an exciting competition for students.

Revision request to make the tutor into a competition between the AI and student and the updated initial prompt to start the conversation.

The AI tutor will now “compete” with students on various coding exercises that incorporate the content covered in the course syllabus that the teacher originally uploaded.

The teacher can use the “revise” feature again, this time to simplify the grading of the assignment to have it more closely mimic the outcome of a competition.

Revision request to change the grading rubric to be win, draw, or loss and the rubric generated by Flint per that request.

Finally, the teacher can make the competition timed.

Session with timer duration set for 20 minutes.

Student experience

As soon as the student starts the session with the AI tutor, they’ll engage in a back-and-forth coding competition with the AI. The student can make use of Flint’s built-in code editor to enter their submission for each problem.

Code editor screenshot showing some inputted python code.

Once the 20-minute timer runs out, the session gets automatically submitted. Students immediately find out if they won, lost, or drew against the AI!

Example student submission where the student won against the AI.

Additionally, Flint uses AI to generate a summary of the student’s strengths and areas of improvement. All of this information is accessible to the teacher as well.

"I can't emphasize enough how Flint has revolutionized my teaching. Flint has been an invaluable tool for introducing new concepts and assessing student understanding. My students have embraced Flint wholeheartedly. My high flyers love how they can deep-dive into course content with an AI expert. Other students who need more attention can get a one-on-one tutor to help with their specific needs."

Matthew Davis headshot

Matthew Davis

Computer science teacher at Episcopal

"Even as the initial novelty of Flint wore off, engagement has stayed exceptionally high. With any other activity, some top students want to move to more complex material, and others need more time on basics. As a teacher, you are stuck trying to find a middle ground. In Flint's activities, I can rotate as a facilitator and Flint automatically scales the assignments to each student's skill level."

Jake Kazlow headshot

Jake Kazlow

Computer science teacher at Westminster

Spark AI-powered learning at your school.

Start a trial to get free access to Flint for any number of teachers and administrators at your school.

Watch the video

Spark AI-powered learning at your school.

Start a trial to get free access to Flint for any number of teachers and administrators at your school.

Watch the video

Spark AI-powered learning at your school.

Start a trial to get free access to Flint for any number of teachers and administrators at your school.

Watch the video