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English Language Arts

|

9th, 10th, 11th

To Kill a Mockingbird AI book club

Have students participate in a book club discussion with an AI in order to discuss their interpretation of different symbols in TKAM.

Screenshot of student session next to book cover of 'To Kill a Mockingbird'.
Screenshot of student session next to book cover of 'To Kill a Mockingbird'.
Screenshot of student session next to book cover of 'To Kill a Mockingbird'.

Teaching goals

To Kill a Mockingbird is essential reading for high school English students, as it tackles important themes like racial injustice and coming-of-age through rich use of symbolism.

While in-class discussions can help students engage with the text, it can be challenging to facilitate the conversation in a way that caters to each student’s level of understanding.

With Flint, teachers can have students engage in a 1-1 conversation with the AI about any book, almost as if they are in a book club that is perfectly tailored to their pace of understanding.

Here, we’ll explore the use case of a teacher using Flint to help students develop their understanding of Lee’s use of symbolism in To Kill a Mockingbird.

In this case, the teacher hasn’t uploaded any supporting materials for the AI to pull from. That’s okay, because Flint already has an expansive knowledge base that covers well known texts.

Learning objective:

Students should be able to explain Harper Lee’s use of symbols in 'To Kill a Mockingbird' such as the mockingbird, the camellias, Atticus' glasses, and the rabid dog.

No materials provided (learn more here)

Extra customization

Based on the learning objective provided by the teacher, Flint automatically creates an AI tutor that can discuss the symbolism in the book.

Tutor type and preview showing how Flint will guide students through a conversation about the symbolism in the book.

The teacher also made sure to change the initial prompt of the tutor to start the conversations by asking the student what part of the book they have read up to. This way the AI can adjust the analysis to avoid any spoilers.

Revision request asking that the AI ask for how far the student has read to start the conversation and then subsequent adjusted intial prompt and rules to fit that request.

Student experience

By starting a session with the AI, students can engage in a conversation about their understanding of Lee’s use of symbolism in To Kill a Mockingbird.

The teacher can additionally choose to set this AI tutor as the “default tutor” for their class page. Doing so gives students an easier way to access this AI tutor 24/7, which can be useful for students as they may want to have multiple sessions with the AI as they make progress in reading To Kill a Mockingbird over a period of time.

Screenshot of a group showing this tutor highlighted as the default of the group in the top right corner.

Once a student submits their session, they get immediate feedback from AI on how they did. The student can then click “create a follow-up tutor” to automatically create a follow-up tutor tailored to improve on their strengths or address their areas of improvement.

Follow-up tutor suggestion generated by Flint with cursor on the button to create the tutor with one click.

Extra customization

Based on the learning objective provided by the teacher, Flint automatically creates an AI tutor that can discuss the symbolism in the book.

Tutor type and preview showing how Flint will guide students through a conversation about the symbolism in the book.

The teacher also made sure to change the initial prompt of the tutor to start the conversations by asking the student what part of the book they have read up to. This way the AI can adjust the analysis to avoid any spoilers.

Revision request asking that the AI ask for how far the student has read to start the conversation and then subsequent adjusted intial prompt and rules to fit that request.

English Language Arts

|

9th, 10th, 11th

To Kill a Mockingbird AI book club

Have students participate in a book club discussion with an AI in order to discuss their interpretation of different symbols in TKAM.

Screenshot of student session next to book cover of 'To Kill a Mockingbird'.

Inputs

Learning objective:

Students should be able to explain Harper Lee’s use of symbols in 'To Kill a Mockingbird' such as the mockingbird, the camellias, Atticus' glasses, and the rabid dog.

Teaching goals

To Kill a Mockingbird is essential reading for high school English students, as it tackles important themes like racial injustice and coming-of-age through rich use of symbolism.

While in-class discussions can help students engage with the text, it can be challenging to facilitate the conversation in a way that caters to each student’s level of understanding.

With Flint, teachers can have students engage in a 1-1 conversation with the AI about any book, almost as if they are in a book club that is perfectly tailored to their pace of understanding.

Here, we’ll explore the use case of a teacher using Flint to help students develop their understanding of Lee’s use of symbolism in To Kill a Mockingbird.

In this case, the teacher hasn’t uploaded any supporting materials for the AI to pull from. That’s okay, because Flint already has an expansive knowledge base that covers well known texts.

Extra customization

Based on the learning objective provided by the teacher, Flint automatically creates an AI tutor that can discuss the symbolism in the book.

Tutor type and preview showing how Flint will guide students through a conversation about the symbolism in the book.

The teacher also made sure to change the initial prompt of the tutor to start the conversations by asking the student what part of the book they have read up to. This way the AI can adjust the analysis to avoid any spoilers.

Revision request asking that the AI ask for how far the student has read to start the conversation and then subsequent adjusted intial prompt and rules to fit that request.

Student experience

By starting a session with the AI, students can engage in a conversation about their understanding of Lee’s use of symbolism in To Kill a Mockingbird.

The teacher can additionally choose to set this AI tutor as the “default tutor” for their class page. Doing so gives students an easier way to access this AI tutor 24/7, which can be useful for students as they may want to have multiple sessions with the AI as they make progress in reading To Kill a Mockingbird over a period of time.

Screenshot of a group showing this tutor highlighted as the default of the group in the top right corner.

Once a student submits their session, they get immediate feedback from AI on how they did. The student can then click “create a follow-up tutor” to automatically create a follow-up tutor tailored to improve on their strengths or address their areas of improvement.

Follow-up tutor suggestion generated by Flint with cursor on the button to create the tutor with one click.

“Flint did a great job at editing my students' pieces and helping them find specific areas of their writing they can work to improve. It freed me up to meet with students one on one and talk about their writing, knowing the rest of my students were doing the same and getting constructive feedback on their work from Flint.”

Andi Bo headshot

Andi Bo

3rd grade English teacher at Harker

"After finishing our narrative writing unit, I uploaded my editing checklist into Flint. The students loved showing the AI their piece, and talking with it about the strengths and areas of growth in their writing. I have never seen my students so engaged in editing. I had initially put a 30 minute time-limit on the assignment, but my students begged me to extend it. Wow!"

Kerri Clifford headshot

Keri Clifford

English teacher at Harker

"Flint has given my students a conversation partner with whom they can discuss ideas, receive feedback, and refine their thinking. After a recent essay, one of my students said that the essay drafting tool in Flint was like having me there throughout the writing process. Flint is providing a framework where AI functions as an assistant for, rather than a replacement of, students' writing."

Stephen Addcox headshot

Stephen Addcox

English teacher at Westminster

Spark AI-powered learning at your school.

Start a trial to get free access to Flint for any number of teachers and administrators at your school.

Watch the video

Spark AI-powered learning at your school.

Start a trial to get free access to Flint for any number of teachers and administrators at your school.

Watch the video

Spark AI-powered learning at your school.

Start a trial to get free access to Flint for any number of teachers and administrators at your school.

Watch the video